Charlie Hebdo


Photographs include work for UnFrame and Maclean's Magazine.


On January 7, 2015, at around 11.30 am, gunmen attacked the headquarters of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris. The attack resulted in the death of twelve people, including the Editor in Chief of the magazine, cartoonist Charb (Stéphane Charbonnier), and two policemen. The fallout was enormous with huge demonstrations by Parisians who stood in solidarity proclaiming 'Je suis Charlie' ('I am Charlie'), a term which quickly became synonymous with freedom of expression around the world. Two days later a hostage taker killed four people at a kosher supermarket in the neighbourhood of Porte de Vincennes and was later killed by police after a major police operation. Meanwhile the Charlie Hebdo killers, the Kouachi brothers had taken a hostage and were surrounded by Police in Dammartin-en-Goele, which ended in the deaths of the brothers. 


Maclean's Politics Editor Paul Wells arrived in Paris the day after the Charlie Hebdo killings to report on the developing story. An excerpt from his story: 


What a week, I tell you. If nothing else, Wednesday’s slaughter of cartoonists and bystanders at Charlie Hebdo seemed at first to have a kind of mad clarity. There was cause and effect, of a twisted sort. The satirical weekly had mocked Muhammad, cheerfully and repeatedly, along with all the other targets of its scrawled cartooning over the years. Protests had greeted the Muhammad cartoons, and worse: Threats and, in 2011, a firebombing. The cartoonists, with the traditional courage of jesters, kept publishing, moved their offices, hired a police escort. Now this. As the two masked gunmen fled the scene, one of them shouted to the neighbours recording smartphone video that he had “avenged the Prophet.” It was shocking and savage, but you could see how it might make sense to fanatics.


The rest of the story by Paul Wells of Maclean's.

Three videos made possible with the editing and production of David Zelikovitz at Maclean's.



 
NICK KOZAK

An undercover police woman covers her mouth near the site of the massacre at Charlie Hebdo on the afternoon of the attack.

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Demonstrators gather in the thousands at Place de la République on the evening of the attack.

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The following day tributes, such as this peace sign shaped with hundreds of pens, pencils, and markers, were seen throughout Place de la République.

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A muslim woman shares her disdain for the attacks as she is interviewed by Maclean's writer Paul Wells near the site of the Charlie Hebdo offices.

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Bullet holes and a broken window at Hyper Cacher, the kosher supermarket where four victims and a hostage taker died on Friday January 9, in the eastern neighbourhood of Porte de Vincennes.

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NICK KOZAK

Police officers in the neighbourhood of Porte de Vincennes during the hostage taking in Porte de Vincennes.

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Henri Bouquet, a resident in the building in which one of the Charlie Hebdo shooters Cherif Kouachi, lived in, speaks outside his home in the Parisian suburb of Gennevilliers.

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Posters for l'Humanité special edition newspaper on a phone booth and strung up along Avenue de la République.

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Crowds at Place de la République set to take part in the Unity March. 

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A child lights candles at Place de la République.

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Demonstrators at Place de la République following the the Unity March. 

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Police guard a barricade as demonstrators watch during a visit by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to the site of the hostage taking at Hyper Cacher.

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A tribute that connects the Charlie Hebdo attacks to 9/11 lays among flowers left near the offices of the publication.

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NICK KOZAK

A man prays at the foot of the Monument de la République at Place de la République, which became a de facto memorial for the Charlie Hebdo attacks.

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